It's Your Life. Treat Your Diabetes Well.

November is National Diabetes Month. Here’s to managing your diabetes for a longer, healthier life.

There isn’t a cure yet for diabetes, but a healthy lifestyle can really reduce its impact on your life. What you do every day makes the difference: eating a healthy diet, being physically active, taking medicines if prescribed, and keeping health care appointments to stay on track.

Read More

Common Illnesses Kids Pick Up in School

Does it ever seem like your school-age child brings home a new infection every few weeks? Kids get a lot of wonderful things in school—math and reading skills, development of social skills to make friends and cooperate with others, learning how to be disciplined and independent—to name just a few. But the unfortunate reality is that school can be a hotspot for bacteria and viruses and a source for lots of common kid illnesses, especially for younger school-age kids whose immune systems are still maturing.

Read More

How to Reduce Screen Time in the Digital Age

Smartphones have transformed modern life in more ways than anyone could have imagined. They enable 24/7 access to infinite information and tools that help us stay organized, track our fitness, express ourselves and be entertained. However, easy access to these digital devices and their habit-forming qualities has led to high screen time for both children and adults and emerging research suggests that such high screen use can have a negative impact on mental health.

Read More

September is National Childhood Obesity Month

About 1 in 6 (17%) children in the United States has obesity. Certain groups of children are more affected than others. National Childhood Obesity Awareness Month provides a chance for all of us to learn more about this serious health condition. While there is no simple solution, there are many ways communities can support children with their journey to good health.

Read More

I thought my bully deserved an awful life. But then he had one.

As a child, I was an easy mark for playground torments: smart, insufferably rule-abiding, decidedly unpretty. The tormenter I remember most distinctly was not my first bully, nor my last, but his attacks would turn the others into footnotes.

He was in my class for years; his mom was my softball coach, driving me to and from practice when my single mother could not.

Read More

EpiPen Shortage

Given the growing national shortage of epinephrine auto-injectors it behooves school nurses to start making plans regarding how their districts will address and respond not only now, but if the shortage continues into the next school year.

Read More

How Schools Can Help Students Respond To Suicide

The rate of teen suicide has steadily increased since 2005. Among youth ages 15-24 years old, suicide is the second leading cause of death. A ripple effect of needs is created when a teenage suicide death occurs. Responding appropriately is critical to ensuring that everyone affected—family, friends and the school community—receives the right type and amount of support.

Read More

Asthma at School: Go or Not?

Has this happened at your house? “Mom? Dad? I don’t feel good. I want to stay home from school." And your reaction is, “What, AGAIN?”

It’s hard to know when children should go to school and when they should stay home – and a chronic health condition like asthma can make that decision even harder.

Read More

Frostbite Prevention

Children are at greater risk for frostbite than adults are. Because of their greater surface area children lose heat from their skin more rapidly than adults do. Parents can help prevent frostbite by dressing their child(ren) in layers and covering all body parts from exposure to the cold by wearing hats, scarves, and mittens.

Read More